Chinese New Year, also known as the “Spring Festival” (simplified Chinese 春节; traditional Chinese 春節; Pinyin: Chūn Jié) in modern Mainland China, is an important Chinese festival celebrated at the turn of the traditional lunisolar Chinese calendar. Celebrations traditionally run from the evening preceding the first day, to the Lantern Festival on the 15th day of the first calendar month. The first day of the New Year falls on the new moon between 21 January and 20 February. In 2017, the first day of the Chinese New Year is on Saturday, 28 January, initiating the year of the Rooster.

The New Year festival is centuries old and gains significance because of several myths and traditions. Traditionally, the festival was a time to honor deities as well as ancestors. Chinese New Year is celebrated in countries and territories with significant Chinese populations, including Mainland China, Hong Kong (officially as Lunar New Year), Macau, Taiwan, Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Mauritius and Australia, and the Philippines. Chinese New Year is considered a major holiday for the Chinese and has had influence on the lunar new year celebrations of its geographic neighbours.

Within China, regional customs and traditions concerning the celebration of the Chinese New Year vary widely. Often, the evening preceding Chinese New Year’s Day is an occasion for Chinese families to gather for the annual reunion dinner. It is also traditional for every family to thoroughly cleanse the house, in order to sweep away any ill-fortune and to make way for good incoming luck. Windows and doors will be decorated with red color paper-cuts and couplets with popular themes of “good fortune” or “happiness”, “wealth”, and “longevity”. Other activities include lighting firecrackers and giving money in red paper envelopes. Among about one third of the Mainland population, or 500 million Northerners, dumplings (especially those of vegetarian fillings) feature prominently in the meals celebrating the festival.

The Rooster (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: 雞/鷄) is one of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac (and similar zodiacal systems) related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Rooster is represented by the Earthly Branch character . The name is also translated into English as Cock or Chicken. Rooster is the only bird included in the Chinese zodiac.

As the Chinese zodiac is derived according to the ancient Five Elements Theory, every Chinese Sign is composed of five elements.

People of the Gold element and Rooster sign are able to distinguish right from wrong, having the clearest mindset and the most considerable power of independent criticism among all of the 12 zodiac signs.

People born in the Year of the Rooster with the Water element agreeing are smart and quick-witted, who are able to find solutions quickly to the difficulties they encounter.

People born in a Rooster year corresponding to the Wood element are fond of being surrounded by others. They are particularly good at playing jokes to relax a tense atmosphere, and they attach great importance to their family.

People for whom the Rooster sign and Fire element overlap value personal loyalty very much, always keep their word, and have a strong sense of timekeeping and responsibility at work.

People born in an Earth element and Rooster sign year are very lively and generous with a style of generals. They are fond of traveling to make new friends from all walks of life, and also try their best to build up their reputation among friends, resulting in them being trusted and highly respected by others. They are also said to have bright prospects.

 

 

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